To the Butler County Sheriff: We agree.

Posted by Rob Brandt, With 0 Comments, Category: Grief, Robby's Voice, Support,

We agree with the sheriff from yesterday’s post. It makes perfect sense.

After all, we all see the addict. This person that did it to themselves and is such a drag on society, a menace to their family, and a problem for those that get paid to serve and protect.

So, let them die, and after they are gone, we can sit around and talk about lives that we knew nothing about when WE made the decision that they were not worth saving.  We can talk about the child that was sexually abused and tried to hide the pain in substances.  We can talk about the youth that was physically abused and wanted to escape the pain and thought substances would help.  We can talk about the teen that was just a bit different, and as a result was chastised, bullied and belittled, and thought that the drug was actually a friend.  We can talk about the kid that was prescribed medication, and because WE did not educate them appropriately, found themselves addicted.  And yes, we can talk about the kid that made a “kids” decision to use something, not image.phprealizing the hell that waited them, and found themselves overwhelmed by the power of addiction.

Why stop there

Once we finish talking about the stories we didn’t know, then we can move on to the next target.  Do you know what we spend annually on diabetes care?  Holy cow, maybe those diabetics should just stay out of the donut store.  And cancer, OMG, the amount of money spent on cancer care, surgeries, and hospice; WOW, if they just didn’t smoke.  Think of the time and money we can save by just letting them die as well.  And old people; talk about a drain…

This is getting fun!  I think law enforcement could then sit back and decide what to respond to.  After all, if you leave a door open, you deserve to get robbed, and if you go to an ATM, you deserve to get robbed; we could save Police time and money by just allowing law enforcement to determine what is or is not acceptable.  After all, I understand the burden of the oath to serve and protect.  Hey, why don’t we add the term “selectively” to the oath – now that works!!!

There’s a reason we’re taught not to judge

Enough sarcasm for one sitting.  So many thoughts cross my mind but the last thought in my head is this. The Sheriff (who appears to be the picture of health): what happens when he drops over from a heart attack? Should we just let him die because he is overweight?  I guess for me that isn’t my decision to make because in my mind, every life matters.